Igrana

Reviews and more information

How to make a garden

MAKING A GARDEN.

The first thing in garden making is the selection of a spot. Without a choice, it means simply doing the best one can with conditions. With space limited it resolves itself into no garden, or a box garden. Surely a box garden is better than nothing at all.

But we will now suppose that it is possible to really choose just the right site for the garden. What shall be chosen? The greatest determining factor is the sun. No one would have a north corner, unless it were absolutely forced upon him; because, while north corners do for ferns, certain wild flowers, and begonias, they are of little use as spots for a general garden.

If possible, choose the ideal spot a southern exposure. Here the sun lies warm all day long. When the garden is thus located the rows of vegetables and flowers should run north and south. Thus placed, the plants receive the sun’s rays all the morning on the eastern side, and all the afternoon on the western side. One ought not to have any lopsided plants with such an arrangement.

Suppose the garden faces southeast. In this case the western sun is out of the problem. In order to get the best distribution of sunlight run the rows northwest and southeast.

The idea is to get the most sunlight as evenly distributed as possible for the longest period of time. From the lopsided growth of window plants it is easy enough to see the effect on plants of poorly distributed light. So if you use a little diagram remembering that you wish the sun to shine part of the day on one side of the plants and part on the other, you can juggle out any situation. The southern exposure gives the ideal case because the sun gives half time nearly to each side. A northern exposure may mean an almost entire cut-off from sunlight; while northeastern and southwestern places always get uneven distribution of sun’s rays, no matter how carefully this is planned.

The garden, if possible, should be planned out on paper. The plan is a great help when the real planting time comes. It saves time and unnecessary buying of seed.

New garden spots are likely to be found in two conditions: they are covered either with turf or with rubbish. In large garden areas the ground is ploughed and the sod turned under; but in small gardens remove the sod. How to take off the sod in the best manner is the next question. Stake and line off the garden spot. The line gives an accurate and straight course to follow. Cut the edges with the spade all along the line. If the area is a small one, say four feet by eighteen or twenty, this is an easy matter. Such a narrow strip may be marked off like a checkerboard, the sod cut through with the spade, and easily removed. This could be done in two long strips cut lengthwise of the strip. When the turf is cut through, roll it right up like a roll of carpet.

But suppose the garden plot is large. Then divide this up into strips a foot wide and take off the sod as before. What shall be done with the sod? Do not throw it away for it is full of richness, although not quite in available form. So pack the sod grass side down one square on another. Leave it to rot and to weather. When rotted it makes a fine fertilizer. Such a pile of rotting vegetable matter is called a compost pile. All through the summer add any old green vegetable matter to this. In the fall put the autumn leaves on. A fine lot of goodness is being fixed for another season.

 

Even when the garden is large enough to plough, I would pick out the largest pieces of sod rather than have them turned under. Go over the ploughed space, pick out the pieces of sod, shake them well and pack them up in a compost heap.

Mere spading of the ground is not sufficient. The soil is still left in lumps. Always as one spades one should break up the big lumps. But even so the ground is in no shape for planting. Ground must be very fine indeed to plant in, because seeds can get very close indeed to fine particles of soil. But the large lumps leave large spaces which no tiny root hair can penetrate. A seed is left stranded in a perfect waste when planted in chunks of soil. A baby surrounded with great pieces of beefsteak would starve. A seed among large lumps of soil is in a similar situation. The spade never can do this work of pulverizing soil. But the rake can. That’s the value of the rake. It is a great lump breaker, but will not do for large lumps. If the soil still has large lumps in it take the hoe.

Many people handle the hoe awkwardly. The chief work of this implement is to rid the soil of weeds and stir up the top surface. It is used in summer to form that mulch of dust so valuable in retaining moisture in the soil. I often see people as if they were going to chop into atoms everything around. Hoeing should never be such vigorous exercise as that. Spading is vigorous, hard work, but not hoeing and raking.

After lumps are broken use the rake to make the bed fine and smooth. Now the great piece of work is done.

How to Start a Garden: 12 Steps (with Pictures) - wikiHow

How to Start a Garden Decide what type of garden to grow. Decide what specific plants to include in your garden. Choose a spot for your garden. Make a garden design. Buy gardening supplies. Prepare the soil. Plant the seeds or young plants according to your design. Fertilize as necessary. ...

8 Steps to a New Garden | Better Homes & Gardens

8 Steps to a New Garden Step 1: Mark It Out. Make your new garden the best it can be. Step 2: Get Rid of the Grass. If you have grass growing in your new garden spot,... Step 3: Dig It Up! Now comes the digging. Dig up or till your new garden, removing any rocks, roots,... Step 4: Edge Your New ...

LANDSCAPE GARDENING

Landscape gardening has often been likened to the painting of a picture. Your art-work teacher has doubtless told you that a good picture should have a point of chief interest, and the rest of the points simply go to make more beautiful the central idea, or to form a fine setting for it. So in landscape gardening there must be in the gardener’s mind a picture of what he desires the whole to be when he completes his work.

From this study we shall be able to work out a little theory of landscape gardening.

Let us go to the lawn. A good extent of open lawn space is always beautiful. It is restful. It adds a feeling of space to even small grounds. So we might generalize and say that it is well to keep open lawn spaces. If one covers his lawn space with many trees, with little flower beds here and there, the general effect is choppy and fussy. It is a bit like an over-dressed person. One’s grounds lose all individuality thus treated. A single tree or a small group is not a bad arrangement on the lawn. Do not centre the tree or trees. Let them drop a bit into the background. Make a pleasing side feature of them. In choosing trees one must keep in mind a number of things. You should not choose an overpowering tree; the tree should be one of good shape, with something interesting about its bark, leaves, flowers or fruit. While the poplar is a rapid grower, it sheds its leaves early and so is left standing, bare and ugly, before the fall is old. Mind you, there are places where a row or double row of Lombardy poplars is very effective. But I think you’ll agree with me that one lone poplar is not. The catalpa is quite lovely by itself. Its leaves are broad, its flowers attractive, the seed pods which cling to the tree until away into the winter, add a bit of picture squeness. The bright berries of the ash, the brilliant foliage of the sugar maple, the blossoms of the tulip tree, the bark of the white birch, and the leaves of the copper beech all these are beauty points to consider.

Place makes a difference in the selection of a tree. Suppose the lower portion of the grounds is a bit low and moist, then the spot is ideal for a willow. Don’t group trees together which look awkward. A long-looking poplar does not go with a nice rather rounded little tulip tree. A juniper, so neat and prim, would look silly beside a spreading chestnut. One must keep proportion and suitability in mind.

I’d never advise the planting of a group of evergreens close to a house, and in the front yard. The effect is very gloomy indeed. Houses thus surrounded are overcapped by such trees and are not only gloomy to live in, but truly unhealthful. The chief requisite inside a house is sunlight and plenty of it.

As trees are chosen because of certain good points, so shrubs should be. In a clump I should wish some which bloomed early, some which bloomed late, some for the beauty of their fall foliage, some for the colour of their bark and others for the fruit. Some spireas and the forsythia bloom early. The red bark of the dogwood makes a bit of colour all winter, and the red berries of the barberry cling to the shrub well into the winter.

Certain shrubs are good to use for hedge purposes. A hedge is rather prettier usually than a fence. The Californian privet is excellent for this purpose. Osage orange, Japan barberry, buckthorn, Japan quince, and Van Houtte’s spirea are other shrubs which make good hedges.

I forgot to say that in tree and shrub selection it is usually better to choose those of the locality one lives in. Unusual and foreign plants do less well, and often harmonize but poorly with their new setting.

Landscape gardening may follow along very formal lines or along informal lines. The first would have straight paths, straight rows in stiff beds, everything, as the name tells, perfectly formal. The other method is, of course, the exact opposite. There are danger points in each.

The formal arrangement is likely to look too stiff; the informal, too fussy, too wiggly. As far as paths go, keep this in mind, that a path should always lead somewhere. That is its business to direct one to a definite place. Now, straight, even paths are not unpleasing if the effect is to be that of a formal garden. The danger in the curved path is an abrupt curve, a whirligig effect. It is far better for you to stick to straight paths unless you can make a really beautiful curve. No one can tell you how to do this.

Garden paths may be of gravel, of dirt, or of grass. One sees grass paths in some very lovely gardens. I doubt, however, if they would serve as well in your small gardens. Your garden areas are so limited that they should be re-spaded each season, and the grass paths are a great bother in this work. Of course, a gravel path makes a fine appearance, but again you may not have gravel at your command. It is possible for any of you to dig out the path for two feet. Then put in six inches of stone or clinker. Over this, pack in the dirt, rounding it slightly toward the centre of the path. There should never be depressions through the central part of paths, since these form convenient places for water to stand. The under layer of stone makes a natural drainage system.

A building often needs the help of vines or flowers or both to tie it to the grounds in such a way as to form a harmonious whole. Vines lend themselves well to this work. It is better to plant a perennial vine, and so let it form a permanent part of your landscape scheme. The Virginia creeper, wistaria, honeysuckle, a climbing rose, the clematis and trumpet vine are all most satisfactory.

close your eyes and picture a house of natural colour, that mellow gray of the weathered shingles. Now add to this old house a purple wistaria. Can you see the beauty of it? I shall not forget soon a rather ugly corner of my childhood home, where the dining room and kitchen met. Just there climbing over, and falling over a trellis was a trumpet vine. It made beautiful an awkward angle, an ugly bit of carpenter work.

Of course, the morning-glory is an annual vine, as is the moon-vine and wild cucumber. Now, these have their special function. For often, it is necessary to cover an ugly thing for just a time, until the better things and better times come. The annual is ‘the chap’ for this work.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lni-sHXLjXA

Along an old fence a hop vine is a thing of beauty. One might try to rival the woods’ landscape work. For often one sees festooned from one rotted tree to another the ampelopsis vine.

Flowers may well go along the side of the building, or bordering a walk. In general, though, keep the front lawn space open and unbroken by beds. What lovelier in early spring than a bed of daffodils close to the house? Hyacinths and tulips, too, form a blaze of glory. These are little or no bother, and start the spring aright. One may make of some bulbs an exception to the rule of unbroken front lawn. Snowdrops and crocuses planted through the lawn are beautiful. They do not disturb the general effect, but just blend with the whole. One expert bulb gardener says to take a basketful of bulbs in the fall, walk about your grounds, and just drop bulbs out here and there. Wherever the bulbs drop, plant them. Such small bulbs as those we plant in lawns should be in groups of four to six. Daffodils may be thus planted, too. You all remember the grape hyacinths that grow all through Katharine’s side yard.

The place for a flower garden is generally at the side or rear of the house. The backyard garden is a lovely idea, is it not? Who wishes to leave a beautiful looking front yard, turn the corner of a house, and find a dump heap? Not I. The flower garden may be laid out formally in neat little beds, or it may be more of a careless, hit-or-miss sort. Both have their good points. Great masses of bloom are attractive.

You should have in mind some notion of the blending of colour. Nature appears not to consider this at all, and still gets wondrous effects. This is because of the tremendous amount of her perfect background of green, and the limitlessness of her space, while we are confined at the best to relatively small areas. So we should endeavour not to blind people’s eyes with clashes of colours which do not at close range blend well. In order to break up extremes of colours you can always use masses of white flowers, or something like mignonette, which is in effect green.

Finally, let us sum up our landscape lesson. The grounds are a setting for the house or buildings. Open, free lawn spaces, a tree or a proper group well placed, flowers which do not clutter up the front yard, groups of shrubbery these are points to be remembered. The paths should lead somewhere, and be either straight or well curved. If one starts with a formal garden, one should not mix the informal with it before the work is done.

The National Gardening Association

Learn how to garden and grow plants successfully from the National Gardening Association. Read articles about vegetables, flowers, and herb and much more.

Curso de Instalação de Placas de Energia Solar 2019

Com a crise do petróleo, aumentos de preços de gás e outros combustíveis a energia solar cada dia se apresenta mais como uma alternativa viável.

A procura por projetos de instalação de painéis solares e profissionais qualificados esta cada dia maior.
A energia solar é considerada como inesgotável. O potencial de energia solar é excepcional em comparação com todas as outras fontes de energia. Veja abaixo o potencial da energia solar como uma forma de renda e negócios.

Curso instalação de energia solar

Curso instalação de energia solar

Clique AQUI
ou na imagem para saber mais

INSCRIÇÕES ABERTAS PARA O CURSO DE INSTALADOR DE ENERGIA SOLAR Veja como aproveitar o melhor momento do setor de ENERGIA SOLAR para MONTAR O SEU NEGÓCIO.

Doogee S60 best phone with gps to camping and buschcraft?

In August 2017, the Chinese manufacturer Doogee announced its new rugged smartphone called Doogee S60.

It has the design of regular rugged smartphone, but there are several surprises inside, such as 6GB of RAM, Helio P25 processor and 5580mah battery. So, let’s make first review with unboxing and hands-on.

Doogee S60 not only rugged smartphone, but also very stylish. It has aluminium alloy back, which helps to give the device a more premium look and feel. Also, new smartphone will be available in different colors, including Black, Gold and Silver.

Doogee S60 is IP68 certified, so you can use it under the water and drop on the ground. It must survive in almost all conditions. USB slots, SIM and MicroSD ports are covered with rubber to prevent water and dust infiltration into the sensitive parts of smartphone. As for specifications, new smartphone differs from other rugged smartphone. Perhaps, only Blackview BV8000 Pro can compete with our hero. While most rugged smartphones offer minimal quality display, Doogee S60 comes with 5.2-inches screen and resolution of Full HD, 1920×1080 pixels. Also, screen is covered by Corning Gorilla Glass 5.

It is good size for rugged smartphone, it is not so large, while the screen is comfortable to use. The same can be said for the rest of specifications.

Doogee S60 has 6GB RAM, 64GB internal storage, and MediaTek Helio P25 processor.

This combination should ensure a solid level of performance. Of course, one of the main thing of rugged smartphone is battery.

Doogee S60 features 5580 mAh battery with fast charging.

It will not only last very long, but also takes a little time to full charge. As for cameras, we were impressed by the main one that has a resolution of 21MP and PDAF technology, and image stabilization system.

The camera can take pictures and video, even when the phone is submerged in water. The video is recorded in 4K resolution. Also, camera provides 9 different modes, such as Auto, Night, Party, sports, sunset, and others.

The phone has a fingerprint sensor included on the back of device.,

Other features include: NFC for quick  paying, wireless charging, and GPS with Glonass.

So, Doogee S60 not only rugged smartphone with durable body, but also very powerful device.

It has high performance, good cameras and interesting features.

The price of Doogee S60 starts from $260.

Click link to see more photos and info about this nice phone.

Archery equipment for your hobby

There are many things that people love to do in the outdoors that keeps them busy when they have time off of work. Many of these things are bonding experiences between family members, and offer a type of relaxation that you can’t get anywhere else. Some families have always been hunters, and this is something they will pass down from generation to generation. Though there are some that use guns for hunting, many like to try the various types of archery equipment on the market for more of a challenge in the woods.

Hunting?

Archery equipment does not have to be about hunting, as it can just be something you do for fun. You don’t have to shoot animals to enjoy using a bow and arrow. You can just go out and shoot targets and have fun while doing so. You can find all types of neat archery equipment no matter what you plan to do with it. You may find that some of it is very expensive, but it is also the very best that you can get. These things can aid you when you hunt, or can be a lot of fun for target practice.

When you are looking for good archery equipment, you do have to think about safety if you have children. You should always have a safe place to keep these things that are far away from wandering hands and interested children. They don’t always understand that archery equipment items are not only for fun but that they can also be very dangerous. As with guns, keep them up and locked, and never take any chances with setting something down just for a moment. Always assume the worst and act accordingly, and the worst will never happen.

Look around online for some great deals on archery equipment, but remember, you may not always be able to buy online. It will depend on your state laws, and even some federal ones may come into play. If you can find something online, and you are able to buy, you can find some great deals on archery items. If you can’t seem to find anything online, you can probably find a great sporting store in your area that will have just what you need. If they don’t, they will probably special order whatever it is that you want. As long as you always make safety your number one priority, archery can be a great and relaxing hobby when you find the right stuff.

 

Archery - Wikipedia

Archery is the sport, practice or skill of using a bow to propel arrows. The word comes from the Latin arcus. Historically, archery has been used for hunting and combat.

Begin an Art Collectible Hobby and Beautify Your Home

Collecting is a fun hobby, and one of the most interesting things to collect are art collectibles. Many different items can be painted with artwork and become an art collectible. Hobby enthusiasts collect such things as saw blades, and wooden eggs which have had artwork painted on. People even collect designer rugs as art. Another art collectible hobby is collecting limited edition plates, thimbles, Christmas ornaments, and figurines produced by such companies as Bradford Exchange. And of course, many people collect fine art paintings.

The person with an art collectible hobby will probably find his or her own favorite artists whose works they appreciate. They can choose to focus on one particular artist, either past or present, or they can choose from the works of many artists. On the other hand, they may collect art and art objects around a theme they enjoy, such as cigars, wild animals, or piano music.

One may think of an art collector as a rich person who has the money to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on an original Van Gogh. A person of more modest means can collect art too, however. Post cards are a good place to start. Most art museum gift shops offer high quality, glossy postcards printed with some of their more notable acquisitions. By buying those cards one really appreciates, anyone can have an art collection.

Ebay is a good source of art collectibles whatever type of art or collectible you fancy. In fact, if you are just starting out, the choices and options can be overwhelming! Just remember that you can sell your own belongings as well as buying those of others. This should make the impact on the budget a little less powerful. Other ideas for inexpensively collecting art collectibles are scouring flea markets, thrift shops, and garage sales. You never know what treasure someone else may be getting rid of.

One nice thing about art collectibles is that artists can be found in every part of the world. The art collector should scout the local art shows, museums, and artist’s hangouts to find out just what sort of talent can be had less expensively and close to home. Because of the local flavor of some artwork, art collectibles make good travel souvenirs. For instance, the artist Linda Barnicott specializes in paintings of scenes, buildings, and landmarks found around Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Similarly, collectors can find local artist almost everywhere.

An art collectible hobby will keep you interested in life and give you a home filled with art masterpieces as well. If you enjoy pretty and interesting things around you, consider starting an art collectible hobby today.

Collectibles & Art | eBay

Collectibles and Art Perfect the Art of Collecting Whether you collect antiques, rare coins, art collectibles, sports memorabilia or collectible toys, eBay offers an ...

Desenvolvido em WordPress & Tema por Anders Norén